Donating blood while on EQ cycle

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  • Hey ya’ll,
    I’m on a cycle right now that includes EQ 300mg/week and I’ve been noticing my blood pressure slowly rising which I know is to be expected but I also remember reading how EQ can greatly increase RBC count. I’ve read that it would be a good idea to donate whole blood somewhere in the middle of the cycle to be a little safer and since it’s a good thing to do anyway and I happen to have several donation centers around me.
    My question is should I donate or is it not responsible since I have been injecting several compounds?
    Should I tell them what I’ve been taking or would that disqualify be?
    I did call them for a little info so I know I’ll be able to donate at least once and then they will screen my blood and do whatever other tests they do.

    Thanks guys

  • [quote=“djmill12” pid=‘64273’ dateline=‘1565297978’]
    Hey ya’ll,
    I’m on a cycle right now that includes EQ 300mg/week and I’ve been noticing my blood pressure slowly rising which I know is to be expected but I also remember reading how EQ can greatly increase RBC count. I’ve read that it would be a good idea to donate whole blood somewhere in the middle of the cycle to be a little safer and since it’s a good thing to do anyway and I happen to have several donation centers around me.
    My question is should I donate or is it not responsible since I have been injecting several compounds?
    Should I tell them what I’ve been taking or would that disqualify be?
    I did call them for a little info so I know I’ll be able to donate at least once and then they will screen my blood and do whatever other tests they do.

    Thanks guys
    [/quote]

    You should donate! I always donate when I can, during and in between blasts. Don’t tell them you’re on AAS, used needles etc., or it’ll disqualify you.

    Obviously don’t donate if you got some kind of diseased blood (HIV,Hep, etc.), but if you’re good on that front, you’re perfectly fine to donate.

    They’ll check your Hcrit, temperature and BP when you go in and ask a shit ton of questions but that’s about it.

  • Like thallandchill wrote, don’t ever tell them about AAS. You will get a permanent deferral, and you will never be allowed to donate again. I ended up on that list and had to jump through quite a few hoops to get off. It goes all the way up to the director for a decision. But are we talking about the Red Cross here? I ended up never donating to Red Cross again even after getting off the list, because every damn time I went, they wouldn’t take my blood because my blood pressure was too high. I had to learn how to self-phlebotomize and never looked back after that. Keep an eye on your iron and ferritin levels, though. You can easily go anemic, and it’ll sneak up and bite you in the ass out of nowhere it’s so slow to happen. Been there and done that. I have to supplement iron permanently because my hematocrit is a constant issue and requires regular dumping.

  • Thanks for all the info…gonna go do it today. Also, I’ve never heard of self-phlebotomy…that sounds interesting.

  • Naringin supplement or eating half a grapefruit a day should regulate RBC. If you have dangerously high levels, I’d self phlebotomize.

  • DO NOT DO A “SELF-PHLEBOTOMY” where you draw your own blood at home. People DIE doing that.

    Don’t be that idiot.

    Try donating through the Red Cross first, they are desperate for donations.

    If you get denied there you can get a phlebotomy done by a professional and just pay out of pocket at a blodo lab, or urgent care, or walk-in clinic, call around. Do not be dumb and try and do it yourself.

  • [quote=“unclecurley” pid=‘64433’ dateline=‘1565457365’]
    DO NOT DO A “SELF-PHLEBOTOMY” where you draw your own blood at home. People DIE doing that.

    Don’t be that idiot.

    Try donating through the Red Cross first, they are desperate for donations.

    If you get denied there you can get a phlebotomy done by a professional and just pay out of pocket at a blodo lab, or urgent care, or walk-in clinic, call around. Do not be dumb and try and do it yourself.
    [/quote]

    Learning to self phlebotomy is an essential tool in the long run.

    Number one you need to obtain your hemoglobin/hematocrit. Don’t draw blood until you do this. Also know that the blood centers do capillary drawn hemoglobin on a point of care analyzer, these almost always read a gram higher then your true reading.

    Do-it-your-self method to obtain a hematocrit while you’re well hydrated: buy a case of 10ml Edta or Heparin(non-gel) blood collection tubes off ebay (needs to be 10ml and not the 3.5 or 7ml tubes) and draw out a tube using a butterfly needle and let the tube sit in a vertical position(tape it to a box if you don’t have a rack) for three days while the cells settle out from the plasma for an estimate of your Hct. If you’re over 50% red blood cells, it’s safe to draw off blood, providing your were well hydrated when you collected the blood.

    Here’s the deal however. Never draw off more then 250ml of blood at a time. You run the risk of tachycardia if you go to town. You draw off more then 500mls, perhaps 600mls and I can assure you that your heart will pick up the pace and it will beat fast for a couple of weeks. This is dangerous.

    As for donating blood, AAS users aren’t allowed. Of course you don’t have to tell them. My problem with the Red Cross is that most of the time they have some new person trying to do the venipuncture, and they going through my vein and end up getting less then needed to complete the collection(not doing me any good). I don’t care about donating because I’m (A neg) and even though the Negative Rh is valuable to prevent the development of Anti-D in women of child baring age, what the blood centers really want is Oneg and Opos…Oneg being the universal blood for emergencies and O pos for men even if it’s highly likely they’ll develop Anti-D if they’re Rh negative. So if your type is O by all means donate, if your ABpos…screw it because that’s the universal recipient and that stuff will sit on the bottom shelf of the blood bank fridge and rarely get used.

    At home I draw my blood easily, I even get my family in on the task sometimes.

    Supplies needed:
    BD Vacutainer Safety-Lok 21g x 3/4" x 12" Blood Collection Set#367281

    Angled arm rest covered with heavy duty clear vinyl. You can make this yourself for $10. Walmart sells the heavy duty clear vinyl in the fabric shop.

    12" modified(by myself) angled hemostat to hold the end of the butterfly needle in place for attaching the 20ml Luer Lock sterile syringes(you’ll need three syringes as they clot up and get harder to draw as time goes on. Gorilla tape your hemostat to your angled arm rest to hold the end of the butterfly needle in place hanging off the edge of the arm rest, if you’re doing this by yourself. Just screw on and screw off your syringes as you fill them, empty the blood in the bucket and reattach this syringe until you fill it 4 times.

    1 Edta or Heparin blood Vacutainer collection tube to check your hematocrit. Do this at the start of your collection.

    Have a small bucket lined with a couple of trashbags and about two pounds of kitty litter in the bottom to soak up the blood. Let it clot completely and then add some bleach for biohazard removal.

    Medical tape…plastic tape because it holds better once you place the needle in your vein. Don’t use paper tape, your needle might not stay in place.

    You’ll draw out 12 syringe fulls + 10ml Edta tube to equal 250mls total. Repeat in 6 weeks if you need more blood letting.

    Have some paper towels, wet ones to clean up any spilled blood. Of course the clear vinyl will protect your table top.

    Stay hydrated before and after drawing blood, stay away from HCTZ.

  • @“Dexter” Do you not have health insurance or something?

    If you have some blood problems that are so persistent, your physcian will prescribe you phlebotomies, it’s so common, easy, and will be covered financially.

    If you just blast a cycle or two and your hemotacrit is a little high, go donate or pay cash for one.

    You can buy BOTOX online and from sources here, great, save some money right? Well there are so many nerves in your face that when your family is helping you save a few bucks you can paralyze your face and cause permanent damage.

    My point is that some things you need to seriously weigh the risk vs. reward and ask yourself if it’s worth it.

    Just because you CAN do something by yourself doesn’t mean you SHOULD.

    best of luck, do your own research on the risks.

  • [quote=“unclecurley” pid=‘64436’ dateline=‘1565460945’]
    @“Dexter” Do you not have health insurance or something?

    If you have some blood problems that are so persistent, your physcian will prescribe you phlebotomies, it’s so common, easy, and will be covered financially.

    If you just blast a cycle or two and your hemotacrit is a little high, go donate or pay cash for one.

    Just because you CAN do something by yourself doesn’t mean you SHOULD.

    best of luck, do your own research on the risks.
    [/quote]

    I’ve worked in hospital medical laboratories in all departments for more then two decades. Blood bank, Hematology/Coag, Chemistry, Microbiology. Worked for the two biggest healthcare systems in the country. Have done independent consulting work where I go in and set up laboratories doing correlation, comparison, calibration verification and linearity, establishing ranges for quality control based on peer data.

    I’ve drawn blood on perhaps 50,000 patients, from newborns to geriatrics. Pulled 24hr straight shifts in blood bank working up traumas, antibody id’s, elutions, antigen typing units.

    As for doing self phlebotomy. I keep my AAS usage to myself. With EHR- Electronic Healthcare Records there will come a day when there is no way to hide what you do. As for your employer and employees spying on your medical records, this is something that happens all the time. I can assure you, medical record snooping of employees is the norm, not the exception when you work in healthcare.

  • @“Dexter” honetly, I’ve lost interest on the crusade to protect the OP from harming himself, but it’s so strange… you know all this shit, done DECADES of blood draws on other patients, making you an expert on it, basically professionaly trained…

    then you take your knowledge and suggest some (who knows, 20 year old? could be anyone) jsut buy medical devices on eBay and draw his own blood? You think that’s appropriate? You know the risks, you have experience, but others don’t.

    So weird…

    we’re not talking about simple IM injections which people can’t even do right without panic, you think this stranger is g2g drawing his own blood at home.

    ok

    enough internet for me today.

    have a good weekend everyone!

  • [quote=“unclecurley” pid=‘64439’ dateline=‘1565462792’]

    enough internet for me today.

    have a good weekend everyone!
    [/quote]

    I’m keeping the OP safe by limiting him to no more then 250ml of blood. He has 65-70ml whole blood/kilo of body weight and probably more if his hct is high.

    As long as he draws out the blood himself he has little or no risk at all if he sticks to 250ml and doesn’t go over. I’ll admit I’ve drawn 800ml on myself when my hct was 67% using the following equation: body weight in kilos x average blood volume (70ml/kilo) x [(initial hgb-goal hgb)]/[initial hgb+goal hgb/2] example: 100x70x[20-15]/[20-15/2]=2000ml total to reduce from 20 to 15 grams. However in the real world drawing out this much blood is dangerous. 1000ml is maximum donation in one setting and this is only for patients in healthcare setting under the supervision of a doctor. I repeat you never draw out more then 250ml on your own as your heart will have to speed up to compensate for lost volume…this is extremely dangerous. Which is more dangerous, high blood pressure or low blood pressure, of course extremely low blood pressure will kill you, so of course keeping sufficient blood volume is important and most people have around 5000mls of blood. The general rule in therapeutic phlebotomy is to remove no more then 10% of blood volume to avoid tachycardia.

    Just like using AAS and my personal philosophy, take the smallest dose possible that will give you the benefits you want. Taking out a small volume of blood like 250ml is enough to benefit while at the same time not putting you at risk.

    Within hours your blood pressure will drop. Your head will stop pounding if you have high blood pressure.

    I don’t know about most people here, but after I draw out blood I feel fantastic, it’s something I’d do even if I wasn’t on AAS as my hgb always runs around 16g when I’m not on AAS, now it runs up to 20g if I don’t draw off blood because I’m always on T and Masteron.

    Unclecurley, the problem with going to traditional medical route is that it can be very tough to explain why your hct keeps elevating if you don’t tell them you’re using AAS. We live in a time where privacy is at a premium, everything you say or do is held against you. Anything that goes into your medical records can be audited. People put trust in their healthcare provider, but there is no privacy, I know working in this field, from the doctors to the nurses, to the administrators… secrets aren’t kept for long. I’ve come to the point I don’t really like working in healthcare because most of it is bulls***, patients could educate themselves and avoid most of their own problems. And of course healthcare needs to be overhauled in this country, the money paid for the service received is out of touch with reality.

  • You could do a double red cell if your place offers it. It takes a little longer, for me it took about 30 minutes last week, but it got my rbc’s back in range.

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